TV

‘Oh god!’ Antiques Roadshow guest gobsmacked by valuation of ornate gold vases

Antiques Roadshow: John Sandon values ornate vases

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you’ve consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include adverts from us and 3rd parties based on our understanding. You can unsubscribe at any time. More info

During a classic episode of Antiques Roadshow, BBC host Fiona Bruce shared some of the best-unseen items from some of the roadshow episodes. Over a three-part episode, viewers got to see some of the staggering valuations, which left most if not all of the guests stunned by the value of their belongings. One guest, in particular, was left gobsmacked when John revealed her grandparents’ gold vases which were made in 1895 were worth £3,000.

Looking at the vases for the first time, John said: “A pair of vases, with wonderful handles, those flower tops their so fragile and amazingly light, they’re fabulous, where did you get them?”

The guest revealed: “From my grandparents originally and then to my parents, and they’ve always been in the family and always out of reach from children so in safe hands and safe places.

“I am drawn into the detail here”, John exclaimed, with the guest adding: “It’s beautiful, as a child, I think on one occasion I was allowed to take them down.

“[And] try and recreate the design of the flowers by painting on paper, it wasn’t a success, so I’m glad I’ve still got the originals.”

Taking a closer inspection of the vases, John explained: “They’re not signed anywhere, but it doesn’t need that I know who they are by, that’s a man named Desire Leroy.

“A French artist, he came into Derby as a great all-round decorator, he could do the lot, he did the ground lay, he did the raised enamel work and the gilding every bit of this was his work.

“He never cut corners, I’m looking at the design, and that gilding is not just one colour gold is it, and when you feel over the surface, it’s raised up,” he explained.

John continued: “He’s built it up on the surface, known as Limoges enamel after the early French enamel on mental that it imitates.

“But he developed a way of building it up layer upon layer, it’s painting in a thick clay paste on the surface, building it up bit by bit.”

John began assessing the vases to see how much they would sell for in an auction and said: “The factory mark says who made it, there’s Royal Crown Derby, and that’s the year code for 1895 so we know when they were made.

“And this is the taste of that time, and I think so beautiful, I can’t see anything wrong with this one, is there a problem with that one?” John asked, picking up the second vase.

The guest revealed: “I think inmy grandparents’ era, the bottom of one of them was broken and has been reattached somehow.”

“That one suffered, that’s a shame, but at least they’re still here together, they’ve been brought back together, you need them both, don’t you.

“They’re a left and a right, and as a pair together, they are going to be £3,000,” John revealed to the guest.

Looking shocked at the amount he had given her, she exclaimed: “Oh gosh, wow, that’s a surprise.”

At the end of the episode, Fiona Bruce revealed the guest decided not to see her vases as they meant a lot to her and her family.

The episode also saw another eclectic find which included a Dior necklace, a collection of 1960s airline cabin bags and a remarkable skeleton clock.

Episode one saw John Sandon also find a trio of ceramic dishes which were being stored unbroken in someone’s attic.

Whilst episode two saw some brooches which had been handed down from the royal family, a spy camera, and a hand-cut paper Valentine designed to win a hand in marriage.

Antiques Roadshow is available to watch on BBC iPlayer. 
Source: Read Full Article