Celebrities

What You Don’t Know About Al Pacino

Al Pacino is a Hollywood legend. He’s captivated fans with his roles in hit films such as Scarface, Serpico, Donnie Brasco, The Godfather, Any Given Sunday, and many more (via IMDb). The actor has enjoyed a long career and has been nominated for nine Academy Awards, per Gold Derby. He even took home the coveted Oscar for Best Actor back in 1993 for his role in Scent of a Woman. In fact, he’s been nominated so many times that he ranks third among the most nominated actors. Only Jack Nicholson and Laurence Olivier have been nominated for the prestigious award more. 

Pacino is also a family man. Although he’s never been married, the actor is the father of three children (via Showbiz Cheat Sheet). His oldest daughter, Julie Marie Pacino, was born in 1989 to the actor’s then-girlfriend and acting coach, Janet Tarrant. Pacino and his longtime partner, actress Beverly D’Angelo, also share two children, twins Anton James and Olivia Pacino. Pacino and D’Angelo ended their relationship in 2003. While it appears that Pacino has it all, it was a long road to success for the actor.

Al Pacino didn't originally want to be an actor

Al Pacino may be one of the most famous faces on the big screen. However, he didn’t originally want to be an actor. According to The Things, Pacino dreamed of being a baseball player in his younger years. The actor reportedly had his sights set on the big leagues as a high school student growing up in the Bronx. “I wanted to be a baseball player, naturally, but I wasn’t good enough. I didn’t know what I was going to do with my life. I just had a kind of energy, I was a fairly happy kid, although I had problems in school,” Pacino told Playboy magazine in 1970 (via Scraps from the loft).

Although he had a big love for the game, he also found a passion for acting and was later accepted to a high school for the performing arts (via Biography). However, Pacino’s studies weren’t a priority and he began to fail his classes. He eventually dropped out of school at the age of 17.

He's been arrested

Al Pacino may have played some iconic criminals on the screen, but he’s also been accused of a crime in real life. When the actor was just 20 years old he was arrested for attempted robbery, per Alt Driver. Pacino was detained by police in January of 1961. He and his buddies, Vincent J. Calcagni and Bruce Cohen, were on the way to an acting job when they were stopped by authorities. The police watched their vehicle circle the block many times before becoming suspicious and pulled them over. During the stop, the actors were seen wearing black gloves and masks. A loaded gun was also found in the backseat of the car.

The three men were charged with possession of a concealed weapon and put behind bars. The trio of young actors spent three days in jail because they couldn’t afford to pay their $2,000 bail. They told police that the gun was a prop that they needed for their acting job and were eventually released. The criminal charges against Pacino and his pals were later dropped.

Al Pacino has been homeless

While Al Pacino has acquired a large net worth, mostly due to his roles in hit films over the years, he hasn’t always been financially stable. After dropping out of high school he struggled to make it on his own, and even became homeless for a while. According to the Belfast Telegraph, Pacino struggled to find acting jobs in his younger years, which had him strapped for cash. He didn’t have a permanent residence and often found himself sleeping on the street. He would also crash at his friends’ homes, or even in a theater to ensure shelter during those trying times. 

Pacino opened up to The Guardian about his days of being broke, adding that his acting career has never been about earning tons of money. “There were times when I was young when I could have used money: after college, I was often unemployed and at one time I slept in a storefront for a few days. But I’ve never been materialistic,” he stated.

Al Pacino is a jack of all trades

While fans know Al Pacino for his incredible acting ability, as well as his work behind the camera as a director, he’s actually held many odd jobs in his life. Before getting his big break in Hollywood, Pacino worked to support himself in any way that he could (via Factinate). This included taking jobs as a messenger and a janitor. He also worked as a busboy at a restaurant and as a postal clerk. In addition, Pacino worked in the mailroom at Commentary magazine during his years as a struggling actor.

Pacino also tried his hand as a stand-up comic in hopes of breaking into the entertainment business, per Deseret. “There’s a facility I have to fall down. I had a certain physical comedy I did with a partner. And I thought I was going to do that, but I didn’t want to be funny all the time, only when I felt like it. And that’s not a good idea,” the actor said of his comedy career (via Deseret).

Al Pacino has turned down several iconic roles

Al Pacino may have given fans memorable movie moments, with characters such as Tony Montana and Michel Corleone (via Screen Rant), but he’s actually turned down multiple roles that went on to become just as famous. According to a report by Mental Floss, Pacino has declined many huge roles in his career, one of which was the character of Han Solo in the Star Wars films. The role later went to Harrison Ford, who made it iconic. “Star Wars was mine for the taking but I didn’t understand the script,” the actor said of passing on the part (via Mental Floss).

The outlet goes on to reveal that Pacino also opted not to take roles in other critically-acclaimed films, such as Born on the Fourth of July, Kramer vs. Kramer, Apocalypse Now, Die Hard, and Pretty Woman. In 2010, the actor explained to Larry King that he doesn’t regret passing on the roles. “Sometimes it’s just not the right role for you and you don’t feel you belong in that part,” he stated. Despite his lost roles, Pacino has had huge success in Hollywood and has become a household name to young and old, who still enjoy his body of work today.

Source: Read Full Article