Celebrities

Mac Miller's Drug Dealer Pleads Guilty To Selling Fatal Fentanyl

 

Mac Miller’s drug supplier has entered a guilty plea with the feds.

According to TMZ, Stephen Walter pleaded guilty to one count of distribution of fentanyl after supplying the counterfeit pills that led to the rapper’s overdose and death. Meanwhile, a second drug-related charge for conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance was dropped.

The 46-year-old is facing a maximum punishment of more than 20 years behind bars, as well as a lifetime of supervised release and a $1 million fine. Prosecutors have recommended Walter receive 17 years in prison and five years of supervised release.

As you likely know, Miller was 26 when he died in 2018 of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, along with cocaine and alcohol. The outlet noted that prosecutors pointed out Walter’s guilty plea “means he was fully aware of what he was pawning off that night – counterfeit oxycodone pills laced with fentanyl” — a synthetic opioid 50 times more potent than heroin.

Alongside Walker, Ryan Michael Reavis and Cameron James Pettit were also charged in connection to the rapper’s death. The trio were charged in a grand jury indictment with conspiring to distribute controlled substances resulting in death and distribution of fentanyl resulting in death.

The 12-page unsealed indictment claims that Walter supplied the fentanyl and cocaine that Pettit sold to Miller, and Reavis acted as a middleman. Pettit pleaded not guilty.

Miller allegedly purchased cocaine, Xanax, and 10 blue pills that appeared to be oxycodone from Petit on September 5 — just two days before he died. In text messages allegedly written to Petit by the Self Care singer, Mac expressed his love for “percs” (aka Percocet, a type of oxycodone). But the pills Mac (real name was Malcolm James Myers McCormick) was said to have bought were counterfeit, and were actually made up of fentanyl.

In another set of text messages included in the indictment, Reavis worried about undercover police buying drugs. The message allegedly read:

“People have been dying from fake blues left and right… you better believe law enforcement is using informant informants and undercover to buy them on the street so they can start putting ppl in prison for life for selling fake pills.”

Both Reavis and Walter have criminal records involving drugs, per the indictment.

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